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: .. (. .) .. .. .. .. .. .. ISBN 978-5-87978-589- ISBN 978-5-87978-590- , .. - ....................................................................... .. , .. , .. - ...................................... .. THE TATAR COMMUNITES AND ITS IMPACT ON THE GROWTH OF TATAR CULTURE IN THE UNITED STATES.......................................................................................................................... .. ..................................................... .. ...................................................................................................... Ekaterine Kutalia COMMUNICATIVE LANGUAGE TEACHING (CLT) THROUGH ENGLISH NEWSPAPER ... Maka Kutalia INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION TO TEACHING ENGLISH LISTENING FOR MEDICAL PURPOSE......................................................................................................................... .......................................................... .. : ɔ ʔ.................................................... . MEHRSPRACHIGKEIT UND DEUTSCH ALS TERZIRSPRACHE IN GEORGIEN........................... .. .. ............................. .. ........................................................................................... .. .. .. ..................................................................................................... .. ........................................... .. .................................................................................. .



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(. -, ) THE TATAR COMMUNITES AND ITS IMPACT ON THE GROWTH OF TATAR CULTURE IN THE UNITED STATES The history of Tatars in the United States of America takes its roots start ing from the 1920th;

the beginnings of Tatar organizations were initiated in the cities such as New York and San Francisco. The first organizations were founded by Tatars who emigrated from Northern parts of China from the regions of Manchuria who were previously settled there during the October Revolution and before that in Kazan. Overrun by patriotic feelings and a strong nostalgia for the Tatar culture, they started to organize cultural activities bringing back Tatar traditions and customs. The tradition of passing down from generation to gen eration the love and the passion for Tatar culture kept the Tatar organizations in a good running state. Despite some difficulties and the influence of other cul tures as United States is a land of immigrants where cultural identity becomes easily diluted they were still able to set up cultural centres and attract younger generation in order to create continuity.

Tatar organizations devised very interesting activities as a program for their members such as cultural activities involving staged performances in Tatar, concerts, competitions, cooking lessons from Tatar cuisine and the essence of the Tatar culture Tatar traditions. Among artists who came to visit these Tatar organizations, were such famous names as Rudolf Nureyev, Aidar Galimov, Salavat Fathetdinov, Renat Ibragimov and the others.

One tradition that is so strongly was kept till nowadays is a tradition for the American Tatars to celebrate Sabantuy every year, this special event col lects the Tatars of all ages and professions from all over the nearby states. In 2010 the first time in history of American Tatars this event was conducted in four cities such as Washington DC, Los Angeles, San Francisco and New York.

The organization of this event was supported by both younger and the older representatives of the Tatar communities which created some great syner gies. Through such programs as Work and Travel, Exchange students, Fulbright program participants and students receiving their PhD or Masters degrees in American universities Tatars were able to visit and live in United States. Many of them make immense contribution to the development of Tatar organizations, by introducing to other people about the Tatar culture and Tatar identity through the teaching of Tatar language and culture in American universities, and participation in international fairs and exhibi tions. In a foreign country is not easy to maintain and instill to the following genera tion of their culture and traditions, but a passionate desire of one Tatar individual can create mission impossible to all the different kind world of opportunities. The American Tatar Youth expects to launch more interesting projects and run joint ven tures with the international Tatars which should also facilitate further communication and development of Tatars throughout the world.

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Ekaterine Kutalia, Assist. prof., a Coordinator of General English and International Exams Program of the Languages Center of the University of Georgia COMMUNICATIVE LANGUAGE TEACHING (CLT) THROUGH ENGLISH NEWSPAPER VOCABULARY Abstract. This article attempts to review in brief how to explore up-to date approaches to the teaching of English as a foreign language through English newspaper within Georgian universities. In this paper we would like to introduce my two-staged approach to teaching some innovative usage of expressions and words commonly used in politics through newspapers and analyses their usage in the political discourse. The first stage is how the students are motivated to be involved in political vocabulary through Newspaper articles. The second is how the articles are used in a communicative way. In addition, this paper explores significant features of Communicative language teaching CLT: 1. an emphasis on learning to communicate through interaction in the target language, 2. the in troduction of authentic texts into the learning situation.

Key words: Communicative Approach, Political Vocabulary, Key Politi cal Terms, New trend of Newspaper Teaching, Communicative Language Teaching (CLT) I Introduction In the past decade, the study of English has grown everywhere in the world, especially in Georgia. In todays Georgia the need to incorporate a rigor ous study of English is more and more strongly felt;

it is standard for students to be expected to be proficient in English. Moreover, the questions of modern methods and approaches to the teaching of English are placed firmly on the agenda in the Ministry of Education and Science of Georgia. Additionally, as the USAs influence on world information is dominant, in recent years, there is an urgent for the adoption of English among politicians in order to compete on an international platform. As Georgian politicians are in direct communication with the USA, the questions of exploring up-to-date methods and approaches to the teaching of use of specific political vocabulary in Georgian political communi cation through newspapers in a communicative way is high on the agenda for the educational institutions in Georgia.

Political language refers to the language used by political subjects in po litical activities such as political speech, political interview etc. One of the major functions of political language is to persuade and control so as to influence the ideology of the audience or the readers. To achieve this purpose, political sub jects use various techniques. This article attempts to analyze the use of political vocabulary used in political language from critical discourse analysis, with the aim of disclosing the power relations hidden behind the political language. The usage of political vocabulary is considerable in any assessment of political trends in Georgia. Politics has its own language that must be understood before you can begin to engage in intelligent discourse. The language of politics can be confusing to those who are just beginning to speak English, but some terms that are casually tossed around also remain enigmatic to those who have spent their entire lives speaking the English language. Politics is a very complex field, it in volves human relationships with a variety of objectives in mind. Politicians have a unique art of expressing the same situation in different words, depending on which side of the table they are. Political language... is designed to make lies sound truthful and murder respectable, and to give an appearance of solidity to pure wind. George Orwell As the general interest in political vocabulary is noteworthy, newspapers also distinguish themselves in political terms and remain an important medium for acquiring political vocabulary in a communicative way. Based on our ex perience and the study in this field, we also aimed at finding a way to teach po litical vocabulary found in newspaper articles and we want to see if newspaper could be a teaching aid to do so. As I have conducted newspaper-teaching lec tures with the senior high students of politics and international relations, it is only practical to use my students as my sample of this empirical research. A characteristic feature for the newspaper lexis is large amount of political terms.

Newspapers enable teachers to meet various needs and interests of their stu dents. Newspapers are providing some of the best motivational and timely re sources. With todays emphasis on resource-based instruction, teachers around the world are using newspapers to supplement textbooks and provide relevant resources in reading, writing, math, science, history, economics, language arts, special education, and second language learning. Using newspapers, students are applying literacy and numeracy skills and appreciating the importance of history and current affairs. And the benefits go far beyond providing resources. Studies have shown that students who use newspapers score higher on reading compre hension tests and develop stronger critical thinking skills. Using newspapers also helps students develop compassion and tolerance for different cultures.

Bearing in mind all these features and positive input of Newspaper in Education we undertook a lot of surveys, questionnaires to make this issue more persuasive and more practical for the students.

Methods and materials We have conducted empirical research to identify students opinions on the need of usage of strategies of political vocabulary through newspaper, to identify university's students' perception on Communicative language teaching (CLT) through English newspaper vocabulary and at last to formulate some suggestions. Questionnaire surveys were organized particularly as a part of case studies. This paper covers the results of a survey done on more than 200 Univer sities Students (gender: men 40 % and women 60%;

age group: 18-20) includ ing University of Georgia, GIPA, Georgian State University;

The survey sought to capture critical date on the use of teaching political terms through newspaper in a communicative way. The objective of the survey was to determine:

1. the English Language proficiency among university's students and at titude toward learning political vocabulary through English newspaper in a communicative way.

2. To identify students understanding of Georgian political language characteristics.

3. Students opinions on the role of political vocabulary through English newspaper.

4. Students opinions on the factors that contributes to English Language learning problems through newspaper.

5. to identify students opinions on the content of political article 6. to identify students opinions on the need of usage of strategies, moti vation and interest of political vocabulary through newspaper Result and Discussion The following summary highlights the results from the Georgian students Questionnaire Surveys carried out in 2010 in order to provide an overview of the cur rent situation of the Georgian universities regarding their use of (CLT) through Eng lish newspaper vocabulary. Judging from the responses to the questionnaire pre sented to the universities, there is recognition of the importance of the development of CLT and a certain level of interest among some of the universities.

Based on the questionnaire results the universities face four key obstacles and challenges in the developmental progression towards the extended use of political terms through English newspaper vocabulary.

1. The lack of teaching some innovative expressions and words com monly used in politics through newspaper are still a very important obstacle 2. Difficulties with the integration of new trend of newspaper teaching in the daily life of the institutions 3. Lacking in special political terms and abbreviations students misun derstand other speakers opinions and fail to convey their ideas in English.

4. The lack of attention being paid to newspaper teaching limits the po tential for extending the use of newspaper articles in communicative way in uni versities.

The results of the questioners show that reading newspaper helps the stu dents to enrich vocabulary and idioms which are used daily but are rarely seen in textbooks. Also, it helps to enhance their interest in current topics by expanding their background knowledge of the issues raised by the article. I feel that this approach should be developed into a communicative approach. Newspapers arent only source of information, but also source of topics to discuss. As Eng lish has traditionally been taught not for communication but for getting informa tion or for academic study, students have not been used to expressing them selves in English. Therefore, one of the common senses observed is that when students are asked to give opinions they become perplexed and remain silent.

As a teaching approach, communicative language teaching is gaining more and more importance in the ESL classrooms within Georgian Universities.

As it is the case, many things are connected with each other, so the successful use of communicative teaching approach depends on the confidence and motiva tion of the students, depend on the teaching atmosphere of the classrooms. In my opinion to start with would be to set up as many situations for communicative activities as possible at the lecture. Negotiation activities including agreeing, disagreeing and persuading are especially a good way to develop overall com municative competence.

First, we must set the goal in accordance with the students levels and needs. Students need to be directed to achieve the goal step by step.

Secondly, the situations for communicative activities should sound natural and meaningful.

Thirdly, in order to conduct the communicative activities smoothly, students should be well informed of the topic they are to argue prior to the activities.

The result of the questionnaire clarified the necessity of teaching political vocabulary and its usage. Reading a newspaper article helps them to build up their vocabulary and expand their background knowledge.

Conclusion The main conclusions of the study are:

The integration of Communicative Language Teaching through English newspaper vocabulary within the universities has a high priority on the political agendas.

According to a questionnaire done with university students most of them mentioned that they liked to read mostly political, magazines. This interest of the university and high school students should be exploited by the teachers to up-date their teaching materials and break the monotony of the lesson by using always the textbooks.

Because of the rapid change in our society majority of people are feeling the necessity of communication education. It means to be able to express ones opinions or exchange information with other people at the right time in a right manner. Con duction newspaper teaching, therefore, is useful to encourage students to have their own opinions on the article they read. Id like to pursue a better way of newspaper teaching to develop students overall communication skills. By encouraging the regular reading of the newspaper and supporting it with guided instruction, we can also establish in our students a lifelong habit which will give them a better under standing of the complex, multicultural world we live References Kitao, S.K. & Kitao, K. (1992). Understanding English Newspaper To kyo: Kirihara Shoten.

Naff, C. & Matsui, T. (2001). Newspaper English. Tokyo: Nanundo.

Littlewood W.1981 Communicate Language Teaching, Cambridge: Uni versity Press Kasper G.(ed) 1986 Learning, Teaching and Communication in the For eign Language Classroom, Aarhus: University Press Blair R. 1982 innovative Approaches to Language Teaching, Rowlery:

Newbury House Cheyney, A. B. (1984). Teaching Reading Skills Through Newspaper. 2d Newark: International Reading Associates.

Fenholt, J. (1985). The newspaper: Your key to better living. Using the newspaper in adult education classes. American Newspaper Publishers Associa tion (ANPA) Foundation, Washington, DC. [ED 299 546] Critical discourse analysis(CDA) is a kind of discourse analysis which emerged in Western Europe in late 1970s and early 1980s.It aims at disclosing the unequal power relations in/behind language. Political language refers to the language used by political subjects in political activities such as political speech, political in terview etc. One of the major functions of political language is to persuade and con trol so as to influence the ideology of the audience or the readers. To achieve this purpose, political subjects use various techniques, among which the use of figurative speech is especially typical. This article attempts to analyze the use of figurative speech used in political language from critical discourse analysis, with the aim of disclosing the power relations hidden behind the political language.

On the Use of Rhetoric in Political Language from the Perpective of Critical Discourse Analysis Stage I 2, 3, 4, 10 to identify students opinions on the need of usage of strate gies, motivation and interest of political terms/words through newspaper;

Stage II 7, 8, 9,11 to identify students opinions on the content of political arti cle;

Stage III 1, 5, 6 to identify students opinions on the working form of the politi cal Vocabulary The main questions that will be answered in this paper are:

I. The knowledge of Political vocabulary can be strengthened by:

a. Oral context clues exercises and assignments b. Written context clues exercises and assignments II. What difficulties do you encounter during the learning process of political Vocabulary?

a. b. c.

III. Does political text require special work?

a. yes b. no c. sometimes IV. The success of mastering political vocabulary depends upon a. age-related peculiarities b. students language level c. pedagogical factors d. on the level of the field V. Introducing the meaning of the new words is desirable a. before beginning a new chapter or unit b. While reading a new chapter or unit VI. To demonstrate the meaning of the vocabulary word is more effective by a. synonyms and antonyms b. texts, visuals, graphic, mimic c. using mother tongue d. word-formation VII. Which factors deter you from understanding text content?

a. Abbreviations (short forms) b. Specific terms c. the high level of polysemy of political vocabulary VIII. Headline considerably the content of the article.

a. simplifies b. complicates IX. How many new political words are recommended to be discussed in one political article?

a. 0-10 b. 10-20 c. 20-30 d. 30- X. Teaching English press will be more enjoyable if it a. meets students needs b. mirrors current event c. covers innovative po litical terms XI. Illustrated articles simplify the understanding of the text content.

a. yes b. no c. partially Maka Kutalia, Assist. prof., English Coordinator for Politics and International Relations Program at the language centre of the University of Georgia INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION TO TEACHING ENGLISH LISTENING FOR MEDICAL PURPOSE Abstract.The paper deals with the effective ways of teaching Medical English listening skills in Intercultural communication in order to improve com prehending communication.

Doctors consistently use special terms as a result patients fail to disclose significant meanings. Patients should be ensured that there is neither miscom munication nor mismatch between what the patient wants and what doctors as sume the patient wants.

Teaching English mostly based on listening skills is very common nowa days, though most people are inefficient listeners.

The research involved gathering data on learners' views on their learning needs and expectations, on encountered difficulties in learning Medical English listening skills at university, the degree of importance of proficiency in medical areas of language, and collecting and analyzing learners' My empirical research questions relate to:

1. How to teach Medical English listening in an easy way 2. The intercultural communication to teaching medical English listening 3. To define the problems that this approach causes in the process of listening.

Key Words: Listening competence, intercultural communication, skills of listening, sound, listening comprehension, English listening for medical pur poses (EMP).

I. introduction The intercultural communication which has replaced the foreign-culture approach is the dominant one today. Intercultural learning is also beginning to impact on English Language Teaching. For the last decade researchers have dis cussed the need for a new approach to teaching culture in languages.

Intercultural communication in Listening has been regarded as the most frequently used language skill in the classroom.

According to the research the average individual spends from 42 to percent of daily communication time listening to medical texts and people mis understand up to 75 percent of what they hear. Students are always complaining about the problems of listening to people, responding to questions, their accent and speed affect on their listening comprehension tremendously. The words those are similar to Georgian words in sound but with different meanings, such as (physician);



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